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Mark Graham

Internet & information geographies

Mark Graham’s research focuses on Internet and information geographies, and the overlaps between ICTs and economic development.

His research on Internet & Information Geographies examines how people and places are ever more defined by, and made visible through, not only their traditional physical locations and properties, but also their virtual attributes and digital shadows.

Specifically, he is interested in how ubiquitous electronic representations of urban environments that are made possible by services and platforms such as Google Maps, Twitter and Wikipedia have the power to redefine, reconfigure, and reorder the cities that they represent.

Of particular interest are the barriers to participation and the way that some people can lack voice and representation in online platforms. This work has been featured in over thirty media outlets around the world (including The Guardian, The New York Times, and Wired) and has been funded by the IDRC and the John Fell Fund. Some of his published academic work on this topic can be found on his website, while more recent work can be accessed on his zerogeography blog and the floatingsheep blog that he co-manages.

Find out more about Mark at the Oxford Internet Institute and as @geoplace on Twitter.